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Peter Zelinski

Peter Zelinski has been a writer and editor for Modern Machine Shop for two decades. One of the aspects of this work that he enjoys the most is visiting machining facilities to learn about the manufacturing technology, systems and strategies they have adopted, and the successes they’ve realized as a result. Pete earned his degree in mechanical engineering from the University of Cincinnati, and he first learned about machining by running and programming machine tools in a metalworking laboratory within GE Aircraft Engines (now GE Aviation). Pete is also the editor-in-chief of Additive Manufacturing magazine.

Posted by: Peter Zelinski 16. November 2018

Video: What Can Force Analysis Tell You About Your Machining Process?

This piece originally appeared as a blog post on MMS Online.

 

I recently had the chance to work with TechSolve, the machining consulting firm based in Cincinnati, Ohio, on filming some really ugly machining passes.

The point was cutting force analysis. Watching poorly performing cuts while also seeing the corresponding cutting force profiles illustrates what force measurement can reveal about the process. In many cases, force monitoring is limited to the machine’s spindle-load monitor, but TechSolve can bring more than this. It can measure forces more specifically and directly using a three-component dynamometer.

Force analysis can be useful for diagnosing the challenges of an application involving a difficult workpiece material and/or an unstable process. To the knowledgeable observer, force profiles can reveal the problem areas in a process—the shortcomings to address to make the process consistent and reliable enough for unattended machining.

In this video of machining 4140 steel, watch the cuts and see the force profiles corresponding to (1) gradual tool failure, (2) cutting with a rake angle that is too highly positive for the process and (3) the development of a built-up edge.

Posted by: Peter Zelinski 22. June 2017

Is Your Machine Shop a Top Shop?

In this video produced for our upcoming Top Shops Conference, I talk about the value of benchmarking and the different benefits that might come from comparing your shop’s business and performance metrics to those of other shops. Also in this video, Gardner Business Media Director of Market Intelligence Steven Kline describes three characteristics that distinguish top shops—the group of shops with the leading benchmarks in our annual survey—from other machining businesses and facilities.

The Top Shops Conference, which will explore ideas and technologies top shops are adopting and the challenges they are overcoming, is the very first of what we hope will be a regular event. The conference runs September 5-7 in Indianapolis, Indiana. 

Learn more about the event and its speakers, and be sure to register for the Top Shops Conference.

For more Top Shops information, visit the Top Shops Zone at MMS Online.

This post is an adaptation of a blog post titled “Video: Are You a Top Shop?” originally appearing on MMS Online.

Posted by: Peter Zelinski 12. January 2017

The Impact of a Horizontal Machining Center

Tri-State Tool Grinding is a Cincinnati, Ohio, shop that, along with the tool grinding in its name, also does general CNC machining. For this latter work, the shop recently made a move many small shops contemplate: the jump from vertical to horizontal machining.

For the shop’s first HMC, it invested in an a61nx from Makino. In the video above, Quality Manager Michael Newcomb describes parts that were formerly machined using verticals, and how those same parts are now machined more efficiently (thanks to fewer setups) on the horizontal machine. He also describes the shop’s use of Mastercam for programming these jobs.

 

This blog post from Peter Zelinski originally appeared at Modern Machine Shop.

 

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